Volume 3, Issue 5, October 2018, Page: 78-85
An Attempt to Model Factors Affecting the School’s Dropout Phenomenon in Yemen
Muhammed Abdul Kareem Al-Mansoob, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Sana’a University, Sana'a, Yemen
Muhammed Saleh Abdullah Masood, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education and Language, Amran University, Amran, Yemen
Abdulhakim Abdurabu Mohammed Al-Abid, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Commerce, Sana’a University, Sana'a, Yemen
Received: Oct. 15, 2018;       Accepted: Oct. 29, 2018;       Published: Nov. 26, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijecs.20180305.11      View  24      Downloads  8
Abstract
Due to many reasons, the dropout problem at the Yemeni schools is escalating tremendously. This study provides an in-depth analysis on school dropouts through analyzing all available and relative raw data that have been obtained in three Yemeni national official surveys: Household Budget Survey (HBS) 2005-2006, Child Labor Survey (CLS) 2010 and HBS 2014. In each survey, a number of dropouts' reasons was investigated and seven of them were found to be common in these three surveys. With attendance status (attended, not attended) as a dependent variable, the binary logistic regression was used to find out statistical significant reasons for school dropouts in Yemen for the two age groups 6-14 and 15-17 years. From each survey, some significant independent variables (reasons) were detected. These significant reasons were divided into six related dimensions namely; poverty, schools’ situation, education willingness, orphanhood, sex of the children and residence area. Careful consideration to these dimensions has led to suggest a number of relative recommendations and also a prototype that addresses the dropout problem and its deep roots in Yemen.
Keywords
Dropout, HBS, CLS, Logistic Regression, Yemen
To cite this article
Muhammed Abdul Kareem Al-Mansoob, Muhammed Saleh Abdullah Masood, Abdulhakim Abdurabu Mohammed Al-Abid, An Attempt to Model Factors Affecting the School’s Dropout Phenomenon in Yemen, International Journal of Education, Culture and Society. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2018, pp. 78-85. doi: 10.11648/j.ijecs.20180305.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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